TELL ME, WHY THE DEEP-SEATED HATRED?


Here is a sutra from Ishavasya upanishad:

 

He who sees the entire world of animate and inanimate objects in himself

And also sees himself in all animate and inanimate objects because of this, does not hate anyone.

 

Dislike or hatred of another is the basis of deep-seated complications for mankind. It can be said that the poison of hatred becomes manifest in all his poisonous displays. The word ‘hatred’ means the desire to destroy the other. Love means being willing to sacrifice oneself for another, if necessary. Hatred means being willing to destroy another for oneself even if it is not necessary. In the way we all live, there is an abundance of hatred and no music of love.

 

The feeling which we call love is, in fact, a form of hatred. In making love, we make another our means for happiness; and no sooner does one make another a means than hatred begins. We do something for another only when we have some hope of getting something from him -- we desire the fruit; otherwise we do nothing. That is why our love may turn into hatred at any moment. If a small obstruction crops up that gets in the way of the fulfilment of our desire, our love will be changed into hatred.

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The Ishavasya presents here a very important sutra which makes love possible; otherwise not. This sutra says that hatred will come to an end only when a person begins to see himself in all animate and inanimate objects, and begins to see all animate and inanimate objects -- the whole existence -- in himself. Remember, the Ishavasya does not say that love will be born then but says, "Then hatred will come to an end."

 

There is a very well thought out reason for saying so. There is no other obstruction in the way of love except the presence of hatred. If there is no hatred, love blooms of its own accord -- spontaneously, naturally. Nothing else is to be done for it to blossom. It is like removing a stone blocking a small stream: once removed, the stream flows on of its own accord. In the same way, the stone of hatred weighs on us.

 

Both these phenomena happen simultaneously: the person who can see himself in all animate and inanimate objects -- all the animals, the whole existence -- will inevitably be able to see all in himself. The person for whom the whole world becomes a mirror, himself becomes a mirror for the whole world. The Upanishad says that when this happens, hatred disappears.

 

Love is the nature of life, so it has neither birth nor death. Clouds of hatred are born and die. Love is covered when those clouds are born; it manifests itself when they disappear, when they are no more. But love is eternal, so the Upanishad does not talk of the birth of love, it says this much only: hatred dies and disappears.

 

This sutra seems to be straightforward and easy. The whole statement is completed in two lines only. It says, the person who sees himself in all objects -- animate and inanimate -- and begins to see all objects in himself, will have his hatred destroyed. But to make all his mirror, or to be a mirror for all, is the greatest alchemy and art. There is no greater art.